Ford GT Driving Modes Explained

Standard

The new Ford GT will come standard with five driving modes that can handle just about any driving condition you can throw its way. By simply twisting a dial, the driver can alter driving dynamics that range from everyday driving to pushing the GT to realize maximum performance.

Ford Performance heard the criticism from drivers about just how difficult it could be to get the most out of their supercar. “We focused on simplifying the experience,” says Derek Bier, Ford GT manager. “Optimizing this car for just about any situation was critical, because ensuring owners always enjoy driving it was a top priority.”

Each mode is individually tuned for a particular driving situation. “Switching the setting changes electronic, mechanical and aerodynamic elements,” explains Nick Terzes, Ford GT engineering supervisor. Each mode also gets its own distinctive instrument cluster display to maximize the driving experience.

Normal Mode

Really, is there anything normal about the new Ford GT? Simply put, normal mode is for everyday driving. Ground clearance is set at 120 millimeters and throttle and transmission are set for standard driving. Traction and stability control are unchangeable and the rear wing swings into action at 90 mph.

Wet Mode

In wet mode, ride height remains at default and throttle control is modified to limit slippage.

Sport Mode

Sport mode gives the driver a more responsive throttle calibration to give the engine a bit more oomph. Also, the anti-lag system keeps the engine’s turbo spinning for boost on demand.

Track Mode

Ford claims track mode is for the diehard racer and is intended for track use only. Hydraulics drop the ride height 50 millimeters, spring rates increase, and damping goes to its maximum setting. Also, the rear wing deploys and aerodynamics fissures up front close for increased downforce.

V-Max Mode

In V-Max mode, every setting is turned to 11 to give the GT the ability to reach warp speed. V-Max mode is designed to give the GT the ability to achieve the best straight-line speed it can.

Photo credit: media.ford.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s